Conference Program

Present Past:
Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice
December 7-9, 2017
Columbia University, New York City

CONFERENCE PROGRAM
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December 7, 2017
8:30am-9:00am REGISTRATION, LIGHT BREAKFAST and COFFEE

(Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th Street)

9:00am-10:30am
FIRST SESSION

Resisting Official Narratives: History and Memory in the Middle East
Panel Chair: Maram Masarwi, Al Qasemi College of Education (Israel)
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“The ‘True’ Victims and the Perpetrators: Lingering Stereotypes Three Decades after the Invasion of Kuwait,” Jinan Bastaki, United Arab Emirates University (United Arab Emirates)

“From ‘Missing’ to ‘Kidnapped’: The Framing of the ‘Yemenite Children Affair,’” Nadav Molchadsky, University of California, Los Angeles

“Lebanon’s Civil War and the Alternative (to the) Archive,” Renee Michelle Ragin, Duke University

“Negotiating Contested Pasts: The Archive as an Emergent Milieu in the Middle East,” Sonja Hegasy, Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient (Germany)


History, Memory and Accountability in Northern Ireland

Panel Chair: Mary McGlynn, Baruch College-CUNY
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 2

“Apologies and Victims of Institution child Abuse in Ireland,” Anne-Marie McAlinden, Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland)

“‘None of Them Ever Really Say Sorry’: Abuses, Apologies and Acknowledging the Past in Ireland,” Kieran McEvoy and Anna Bryson, Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland)

“The Irish Republican ‘Family’ and Commemoration of the Contested Past: The Legacies of 1916 and 1981,” Stephen Hopkins, University of Leicester (United Kingdom)

The Legacies of Settler Colonialism
Panel Chair: Alison Atkinson-Phillips, Murdoch University (Australia)
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Selective memories: The Paradox of One Settler-Colonial Human Rights Museum,” Brenda Trofanenko, Acadia University (Canada)

“The Legacy of Settler Colonialism in the American West: The Indian Claims Commission, a Measure of Justice?” Baligh Ben Taleb, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

“Lives on the Line: Racial Violence, Humanitarian Governance and Reparative Projects,” Carmela Murdocca, York University (Canada)

“Redressing Historical Abuse in New Zealand: a Critique,” Steve Winter, University of Auckland (New Zealand)

Non-Textual Approaches to the Negotiation of Historical Justice
Panel Chair: Lura Limani, Prishtina Insight (Kosovo) and Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, first floor, Ivy Lounge

“Re-Plotting the Past: Cartographies of Violence and Memory in Post-Atrocity Argentina, Germany, and the United States,” Kerry Whigham, Columbia University and the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation

“Patricio Guzmàn and Germàn Berger: From the Personal to the Collective,” Patricia Varas, Willamette University

“Four Faces of Omarska: Employing Memory Activism as a Form of Memorialization,” Srdjan Hercigonja, Singidunum University (Serbia) and Columbia University

“Postcolonial and Postsocialist Politics of Erasures in Sarajevo,” Piro Rexhepi, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity (Germany)

 

10:30am-11:00am COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)

11:00am -12:30pm SECOND SESSION

This Is Us: How Time, Actors, and Politics Shape European Historical Memory and Identity
Panel Chair: Claudia Sbuttoni, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Amnesias and Conventional Truths in the Italian Transition from Fascism to Democracy,” Paolo Caroli, University of Trento  (Italy)

“Politics of Truth, Memory and Reconciliation against Terrorist Violence: the case of the Basque Country,” Elena Maculan, Instituto Universitario Gutiérrez Mellado, UNED (Spain) and University of Trento (Italy)

“Historicizing Memory, Organizing Silence(s): the Portuguese Colonial War in a Mirror,” Miguel Cardina, University of Coimbra (Portugal)

Memory, Sound, Space: The Holocaust and World War II
Panel Chair: Kerry Whigham, Columbia University and the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Holocaust Representation in Music of Polish Composers,” Ania Sundstrom, Independent Scholar

“The Reception of the Holocaust in Japan, a Comparative Perspective: Memorialization Outside the Place,” Ariko Kato, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies (Japan)

“Public Memory Messaging Regarding Holocaust History in Vienna,” Karen Frostig, Lesley University and Brandeis University

“Measure for Measure: Narrative and Numbers in Holocaust Textual Memorials,” Jessica Lang, Baruch College

Asian Memory Culture and the Challenge to Trauma
Panel Chair: Eve Zucker, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, First floor, Ivy Lounge

“Economy of Inheritance: Generational Transmission of Loss in Post-colonial East Asia,” Yukiko Koga, Hunter College – City University of New York

“Survivors: Psychological Trauma and Memory Politics in Hiroshima and Auschwitz,” Ran Zwigenberg, Pennsylvania State University

“Narrative Histories of Nuclear Disaster: Hibakusha Memories and Mythologies,” Mariko Nagai, Temple University (Japan Campus)

“About Forgetting,” Josephine Park, University of Pennsylvania

Roundtable:
Comparing Tainted Pasts and “New Beginnings”: The Political, Judicial, and Cultural Responses to the Financial Crisis in Greece, Iceland, Ireland, and Spain

Moderator: Valur Ingimundarson, University of Iceland (Iceland)
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 2

Valur Ingimundarson, University of Iceland (Iceland)
Irma Erlingsdóttir, University of Iceland (Iceland)
Gunnþórunn Guðmundsdóttir, University of Iceland (Iceland)
Gerardine Meaney, University College Dublin (Ireland)

12:30pm-1:45pm LUNCH BREAK (participants are on their own for lunch!)

1:45pm-3:15pm THIRD SESSION

Digital Spaces: New Media and Dealing with the Past
Panel Chair: Alexander Karn, Colgate University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Historical Dialogue and Transitional Justice in Africa’s Great Lakes Region,” Carla De Ycaza, Columbia University and New York University

“Transitional Memory and Digital Spaces. A Comparative Study of Web-Based Reactions to Genocide Memorials,” Timothy Williams, Marburg University (Germany)

“Visualizing History: Righting Historical Wrongs at the Turn of the Millennium,” Franziska Seraphim, Boston College

“Encountering ‘Both Sides’: Memories from the ‘Liberated’ and the ‘Liberators’ in Blooks from the Iraq War,” Yvonne Brandt, University of Innsbruck (Austria)


Place, Time, and Institutional Memories of Violence

Panel Chair: Fearghus Roulston, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)
Room: Faculty House, First Floor, Ivy Lounge

“Spaces of Liminality: On the Threshold of Memory at the Mémorial du Camp de Rivesaltes,” Ian Cantoni, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

“The Imperial War Museum, London: 100 Years of Change,” Kasia Tomasiewicz, University of Brighton and the Imperial War Museum, London (United Kingdom)

“Behind the Neoclassical Façade: A Haunted National Monument in Post-Dictatorship Chilean film,” Struan Gray, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

“Spaces of Acknowledgment and the Legitimation of the Past in the Basque Country,” Andrea García González, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)


Using and Abusing ‘Memory Laws’ in Historical Justice Discourse: the Case of Poland

Panel Chair: Agi Legutko, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Calling Murders by Their Names as an Act of Betrayal of One’s Nation: The Jedwabne Pogrom Case and the Crime of ‘Defamation of the Polish Nation’,” Aleksandra Gliszczyńska-Grabias, Institute of Law Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland)

“Using ‘Genocide’ in International Relations: Resolution of the Polish Parliament on the Wołyń Massacre of 1943-1944 and its Implications,” Grażyna Baranowska, Institute of Law Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland)

“Economic Revenge on Post-Communist Elites through Law on Pensions: the Case of Poland under Second Law and Justice Government,” Anna Wójcik, Institute of Law Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland)

Roundtable:
The Multiple Dimensions of Silence in Latin American Narratives of the Past

Moderator: Emily Willard, University of Washington
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 2

Sonja Perkič-Krempl, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
Rafael Andrés Patiño, Universidade Federal do Sul da Bahia (Brazil)
Tamy Guberek, University of Michigan
Jo-Marie Burt, George Mason University and Washington Office on Latin America
Rachel Hatcher, Concordia University (Canada) and University of the Free State (South Africa)

3:15pm-3:45pm COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)


3:45pm-5:15pm KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Room: Faculty House, Second Floor
Keynote Speaker: Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, Stellenbosch University (South Africa)
The Cry of Nomonde Calata: Traumatic Memory, Legacies of the Past and Contemporary Ruptures

Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela is Professor and Research Chair for Historical Trauma and Transformation at Stellenbosch University.

5:15pm-7:30pm ISHR RECEPTION (15th floor, International Affairs Building)

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December 8, 2017

8:30am-9:00am REGISTRATION, LIGHT BREAKFAST and COFFEE
(Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th Street)


9:00am-10:30am FIRST SESSION

International Diplomacy, Law, and the Politics of Memory
Panel Chair: Anna Kirstine Schirrer, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Historical Injustice: The Diplomatic and Civil Failures in Cyprus,” J.D. Bowers, University of Missouri

“Monument Diplomacy: Utilitarian Value of Remembrance,” Ana Milošević, KU Leuven (Belgium) and University of Maastricht (Netherlands)

“Naming, Shaming, and Backlash: International Pressures, Feedback Effects, and the Politics of Memory,” Jennifer M. Dixon, Villanova University

“The Legal Limits of Malleable Memory: International Cultural Heritage Law and Transnational Justice,” Lucas Lixinski, UNSW (Australia)

Public Memory Initiatives in Visual and Material Culture
Panel Chair: Alexander Karn, Colgate University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 2

“Uganda Martyrs and Public Memory Discourses: Globalization and Commemorative Memorial Practices,” Nakanyike Musisi, University of Toronto (Canada)

“The Milingimbi Makarrata: a Negotiation of Historical Justice,” Louise Hamby, Australian National University (Australia)

“From Imperial Garden to National Body: The Yuanming Yuan and Memories of Historical Injustice as Visualized in Contemporary Chinese Art,” Patricia J. Yu, University California, Berkeley

“Negotiating narratives: the case of Srebrenica,” Simone Remijnse and Inge Baanders, PAX Peace Organization (the Netherlands)

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Historical Justice, Accountability and Reconciliation in an Ongoing Conflict
Panel Chair: Debby Farber, Ben Gurion University and Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Historical Justice and Birthright on Display: Archaeology and the Present,” Noa Hazan, Tel Aviv University (Israel) and New York University

“How Arab teachers in Israel Deal with Traumatic Political Commutation: The Case of Kufr Qassim Massacre,” Maram Masarwi, Al Qasemi College of Education (Israel)

“Transnational Representation in the Public Space: Beersheba’s Grand Mosque in a Comparative Perspective,” Lior Lehrs, New York University

“Historical Acknowledgment as a Conflict Negotiation Strategy: Insights from Israel/Palestine,” Michal Ben Josef Hirsch, Suffolk University

Roundtable:
Story, Narrative, and Voice in Human Rights

Moderator: Louis Bickford, Columbia University, New York University and Memria.org
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

Laila Pedro, Independent Scholar
Benjamin de la Piedra, Columbia University
Jee Kim, The Narrative Initiative
Louis Bickford, Columbia University, New York University, and Memria.org


10:30am-11:00am COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)

11:00am-12:30pm SECOND SESSION

Justice, Politics and Memory: Holocaust Narrative and Counter Narrative
Panel Chair: Berel Lang, SUNY-Albany
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Witnesses: The Culture of ‘Maybe Again’,” Dennis Klein, Kean University

“Fascism’s War on Memory: Writing/Filiming/Working Through Franco Fortini, Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub,” Giuliana Minghelli, McGill University (Canada)

“Historic Justice, Political Temporality and the Injuries of Normality,” Kathrin Braun, University of Vienna (Austria)

“National Narratives, Counternarratives, and the Effects of Shifting Geopolitical Contexts on 21st Century Holocaust Education,” Sarah Jane Kerr-Lapsley, McGill University (Canada)

Defining Victimhood: Questions of Justice and Politics in Post-Conflict Societies
Panel Chair: Elazar Barkan, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 2

“Concepts of Victimhood: Why the Scope of the Category Matters,” Diana Tietjens Meyers, University of Connecticut, Storrs

“International Feminism on Trial: Expert Testimony on Forced Marriage at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia,” Sarah Deibler, Harvard University Law

“Enforced Disappearance, Affect Mobilization and Forensic Inequity,” Mangalika de Silva, New York University

“Time, Space, and Contestation at Paksan Valley: The Evolving Public Discourses of the Sinwŏn Massacre, 1954-Present,” Brendan Wright, Carleton University (Canada)

Screening the Past: Contested Historical Narratives for Turks and Armenians
Panel Chair: Armen Marsoobian, Southern Connecticut State University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“From Silent Film to the Silencing of Film: Exiling the Armenian Genocide from Mainstream Cinema,” Armen T. Marsoobian, Southern Connecticut State University

“Contesting Commemorations: Different Narratives of 1915 in Cinema,” Melis Behlil, Kadir Has University (Turkey)

“‘Glorious’ History in Crises,” Esin Paça-Cengiz, Kadir Has University (Turkey)

The Dialectics of Memory: Oral History, Narrative, and the Trauma of War
Panel Chair: Mary Marshall Clark, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

“Beyond the Modality of the Interview: Thinking Through an Ethics of Acknowledgment for War and its Afterlives,” Lina Chhun, University of California, Los Angeles

“The Accidental Nature of Atrocities: Time, Trauma and Justice in a post-WWII Greek Village,” Lidia Santarelli, Princeton University

“Narrating Times of Fascism: Oral History of the 1980 Coup D’Etat in Turkey – A Quest for Historical Justice Under Impunity,” Eylem Delikanli, Research Institute on Turkey (RIT) and Columbia University


12:30pm-1:45pm LUNCH BREAK (participants are on their own for lunch!)

1:45pm-3:15pm THIRD SESSION

Negotiating Public Memory and Memorialization
Panel Chair: Jonathan Bach, The New School
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Writing and Reading Memories at a Buenos Aires Memorial Site: the Ex-ESMA,” Susana Kaiser, University of San Francisco

“Time and Temporality in the National September 11 Memorial Museum,” Amy Sodaro, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

“Slavery and Its Legacies: Contestation in the U.S. Memory Landscape,” Jill Strauss, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

“Challenging the Symbolic Representation of the Franco Dictatorship after the Memory Law: The Street Name-Controversy in Madrid,” Ulrike Capdepón, Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS) Princeton University

Time and Crime without Punishment
Panel Chair: Volker Berghahn, Columbia University
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Confronting the Crimes of the Soviet Past: too Early or too Late?” Nanci Adler, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

“Confronting Cold War Crimes in Chad: Before it was too Late,” Thijs B. Bouwknegt, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Universities of Amsterdam, Utrecht and Leiden (the Netherlands)

“Confronting Colonial Crimes: Legal Frames and their Effects,” Nicole L. Immler, University of Humanistic Studies (the Netherlands)

“The Crimes of Others: the Dutch Perception of War Crimes in the Long 1940s,” Peter Romijn, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)


Oral Histories and Contested Temporalities of Peace and Conflict in Belfast and Derry/ Londonderry

Panel Chair: Andrea García González, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 802

“Cross-Community Oral History, Post-Conflict Geography and the Complex Temporalities of Conflict Transformation at West Belfast Interfaces,” Graham Dawson, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

“Punk, Memory and Place in Belfast,” Fearghus Roulston, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

“’Nothing Happened to Me’: The ‘Speakable’ and ‘Hearable’ in Personal Narratives of Youth Experience during the Northern Irish Conflict, 1969-1998?,” Lucy Newby, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

“Urban Rhythms and the Afterlives of Conflict in Derry/Londonderry,” Garikoitz Gomez Alfaro, University of Brighton (United Kingdom)

Roundtable:
New Past Memory – Time for Mizrahi Justice in Israel

Moderator: Zvi Ben Dor Benite, New York University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

Yifat Bitton, College of Management Law School (Israel)
Shoshi Madmoni-Gerber, Suffolk University
Efrat Fudem, Tmura Antidiscrimination Clinical Center and The Israeli Coalition against Racism (Israel)
Inbal Maimon-Blau, Tel Aviv University Law School (Israel)


3:15pm-3:45pm COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)

3:45pm-5:15pm FOURTH SESSION

Transitional Justice as History
Panel Chair: Virginie Ladisch, International Center for Transitional Justice
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 1

“Uruguay’s ‘Torturous’ Negotiations and the Origins of Accountability Battles: The Case of Josè Luis Massera,” Debbie Sharnak, Harvard University

“Homecomings from The Hague: Public Perception of the Defendants from the ICTY in the aftermath of the Legal Trials,” Jovana Mihajlović Trbovc, Institute of Culture and Memory Studies (Slovenia)

“Collective memory and the uses of history in Tunisia’s transitional justice process: Teaching recent history and the figure of Bourguiba today,” Simon Robins, Center for Applied Human Rights

“A Critique of South Africa’s TRC in Sindiwe Magona’s Mother to Mother,” Jess Engebretson, Columbia University

The Responsibility of Remembering the Past and Imagining the Future: the Case of the Basque Country
Panel Chair: Jon-M. Landa, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain)
Room: Faculty House, Second Floor, Room 3/4

“Dealing with Political Violence in the Past: The Basque Legal Approach,” Jon M. Landa, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain)

“Language, Memory and Identity: The Paradoxes of Institutional Repression,” Andrea Bartoli, Seton Hall University

“Chosen Trauma in the Basque Country: Examining the Case of Guernica,” Borislava Manojlovic, Seton Hall University

“Post-Transitional Justice as a Key Concept to Deal with Violent Past,” Antton Maya, Université de Pau et de Pays de l’Adour (France) and the University of the Basque Country (Spain)

Youth and Intergenerational Approaches to Historical Justice and Redress
Panel Chair: Gergana Halpern, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 802

“Youth Seeking Justice in the Aftermath of Collective Violence: Predictors of Youth’s Interest in Justice and Preferences for Retributive and Restorative Justice in Bangladesh,” Yeshim Iqbal, New York University

“The Silences of Memory: Remembering, Forgetting and Memorializing Violence, Trauma, and Displacement in South Asia,” Isha Dubey, Aarhus University (Denmark)

“Bottom-Up Civic Alternatives to Nationalist Commemorations – Youth as Memory Entrepreneurs in Post-Conflict Bosnia and Herzegovina,” Mitjo Vaulasvirta, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

“‘Völkermörd Verjärht Nicht. (There is No Statute of Limitations for Genocide)’: The OvaHerero Vs the Federal Republic of Germany,” Howard Rechavia Taylor, Columbia University

History Education: Pedagogy and the Challenges of Teaching about the Violent Past
Panel Chair: Felisa Tibbits, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, room 1302

“The Ability of Exposure to the Suffering of the Other, National Honor and Dignity Perceptions to Promote Reconciliation, in the Context of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict,” Becky Leshem, Achva Academic College (Israel)

“Controversy in the Classroom? How do History Teachers in Western Balkans Approach Sensitive and Controversial Topics?” Dea Marić, University of Zagreb (Croatia) and Rodoljub Jovanović, University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

“Challenges and Opportunities for History Education in Pursuit of Reconciliation in Canada,” James Miles, University of Michigan

5:15pm-5:30pm COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)


5:30pm-7:00pm KEYNOTE

Keynote Speaker: Ambassador Sarah Mendelson (Washington, DC)
Closing the Policy Gap around the Present Past: Lessons Learned While Serving

Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1501

Ambassador Mendelson served until January 2017 as the U.S. representative to the United Nations’ Economic and Social Council. With over twenty five years as a human rights scholar and practitioner, she also earned a Ph.D in political science from Columbia University.

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December 9, 2017

8:30am-9:00am REGISTRATION, LIGHT BREAKFAST and COFFEE
(Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th Street)

9:00am-10:30am FIRST SESSION

Uses of History in Genocide Prevention I
Teaching the Past and Genocide Prevention: Education Inside and Outside the Classroom

Panel Chair: Ariella Lang, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1219

“History as Genocide Prevention: The Case of Ordinary Soldiers,” Michael Geheran, U.S. Military Academy

“Can Exhibitions Induce Empathy and Prevent Genocide?,” Kara Blackmore, London School of Economics and Political Science (United Kingdom)

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding,” Abigail Branford, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

“Teaching Peace and Conflict Modules to Deconstruction of Genocide in Nigeria,” Olakunle Folami, Adekunle Ajasin University (Nigeria)

Monuments and Memorials: The Debate on Statue Removal and How Communities Remember
Panel Chair: Jill Strauss, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1512

“Removed, Not Gone: The Louisville Confederate Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument and the Politics of Confederate Monument Removals,” Joy M. Giguere, Penn State York

“A Question Mark on a Pedestal,” Volker Benkert, Arizona State University

“The Capital Tour: Memory-Making and the Politics of Field-Trip Narration,” Julia Brown-Bernstein, Independent Scholar

The Rhetoric of Remembrance
Panel Chair: Stephen Browne, Pennsylvania State University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

“From Regret to Pride: Mnemonic Practices in Post-Communist Russia,” Ekaterina Haskins, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

“Witness the Children: Public Eulogies, Collective Trauma, and Historical Justice,” Bradford Vivian, Pennsylvania State University

“Theorizing Collective Metanoia: Apology, the Penitent Self, and the Penitent State,” Adam Ellwanger, University of Houston – Downtown

“Never Forget: Remembrance as a Requirement of Public Forgiveness,” Allison Niebauer, Pennsylvania State University

Roundtable:
Sources of Evidence: International and Local Archives and How They Have Shaped the Narration on 1965 Violence in Indonesia

Moderator: Jess Melvin, Yale University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1201

Andrew Conroe, Independent Scholar
Bernd Schaefer, George Washington University
Bradley Simpson, University of Connecticut
Baskara Wardaya, Sanata Dharma University (Indonesia)

10:30am-11:00am COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)

11:00am-12:30pm SECOND SESSION

Uses of History in Genocide Prevention II
The Legacies of ‘Never Again’: Cultural and Legal Frameworks to Genocide Prevention

Panel Chair: Jonathan Bush, Columbia Law School
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1219

“The ICTY’s Role in the Struggle against the Denial of Genocide,” Eszter Kirs, Corvinus University of Budapest (Hungary)

“The Perinçek Case before the European court of Human Rights: Some Reflections on Denial, Law, History and Genocide Prevention,” Sévane Garibian, University of Geneva and University of Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

“The Failure of the ‘Never Again:’ Remembering the Shoah and its Criticalities,” Fiorenza Loiacono, University of Bari (Italy)

“History and Conflict Prevention in Guatemala: Can Human Rights Advocates Ask Why?,” Betsy Konefal, The College of William and Mary

El Salvador 1932 – The Right to Truth: The Discourse for Indigenous Rights & Historical Memory on the 25th Anniversary of the Peace Accords
Panel Chair: Zar Castillo, Independent Scholar
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

“The events of 1932 in El Salvador in political discourse, 1932-1992,” Hector Lindo Fuentes, Fordham University

“The events of 1932 in El Salvador as remembered in memoir and testimony since 1992,” Erik Ching, Furman University

“The shaping of indigenous identity through a history of violence,” Ebany Dohle, University of London (United Kingdom)

Sites of Memory: Landscapes as Places of Memory and Forgetting
Panel Chair: Ulrike Capdepón, Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS), Princeton University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1512

“The Sedimentation of Memory: Materials and Time,” Anita Bakshi, Rutgers University

“Historical Amnesia and the Landscape as Archive in (Post-)Conflict Colombia,” Liliana Gómez-Popescu, University of Zurich (Switzerland)

“Therapeutic Forgetting, Agonistic Remembrance,” Devrim Sezer and Emre Gönlügür, Izmir University of Economics (Turkey)

“The Norwegian Campscape Falstad and the Struggle with Time,” Annette H. Storeide, NTNU (Norway)

Roundtable:
Interpreting the Indonesian Genocide

Moderator: Bradley Simpson, University of Connecticut
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1201

Annie Pohlman, University of Queensland (Australia)
Jess Melvin, Yale University
Akihisa Matsuno, Osaka University (Japan)

12:30pm-1:45pm SPECIAL LUNCH SESSION (light lunch will be served):
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1512
Breaking the Silence of a History Denied: An Armenian Family’s Story Reimagined
Armen Marsoobian will speak about the exhibit currently on display on the fourth floor of the International Affairs Building.
This exhibition chronicles both the history of an Armenian family in the waning decades of the Ottoman Empire and the retelling of that history in Turkey today. Based upon a rich archive of memoirs and the photographs produced by the noted Ottoman-Armenian Dildilian Brothers photography studios, this exhibition follows the family history from the 1870s in central Anatolia to their forced exiled to Greece in 1922. This time of rich cultural development and heightened political awareness for the Armenian nation was also marked by violent repression, culminating in the genocide of 1915. The Armenians’ presence in their historical homeland was erased and the act of their erasure was denied. For nearly a century the story of the Armenians’ fate has been silenced in the Republic of Turkey. With the courageous assistance of the Turkish NGO Anadolu Kültür, Armen T. Marsoobian, a descendent of the Dildilians, has brought this story to cities across Turkey. His exhibitions, publications and presentations attempt to foster dialogue and break the silence of a history too long denied.

1:45pm-3:15pm THIRD SESSION

Uses of History in Genocide Prevention III
Civil Society Initiatives and Atrocity Prevention

Panel Chair: Kerry Whigham, Columbia University and the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation
Room: 
International Affairs Building, Room 1219
“The Role of CSOs in Genocide Prevention: The WANEP’s Experience in West Africa,” Jara Cuadrado Bolaños, Instituto Universitario General Gutiérrez Mellado and UNED (Spain)

“The 1965 Anti-Communist Purge in Indonesia and Genocide Prevention Initiatives,” Baskara Wardaya, Sanata Dharma University (Indonesia)

“Bringing Them Home WA: 20 Years of Genocide Prevention Work in Australia,” Alison Atkinson-Phillips, Murdoch University (Australia)

“Lessons Learned on Regional Reconciliation Efforts in Northern Uganda,” Oryem Nyeko, Justice and Reconciliation Project (Uganda)


Present Pasts: The Legacies of Slavery and Segregation in the U.S.

Panel Chair: Mary Tibbetts Freeman, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1512

“Transformative Narratives; ‘Four Little Girls,’ Racial Justice and whites’ Recollections of Birmingham,” Sandra K. Gill, Gettysburg College

“History, Memory and the Weeping Time Slave Auction,” Anne C. Bailey, Binghamton University

“Little Rock School Desegregation: 60 Years Later,” Benji de la Piedra, Columbia University

“What Constitutes Restorative Justice: Informed by the Voices of Those Wronged Fifty Years Later,” Linda J. Mann, Georgetown Memory Project


The Future of the Past: Memory Discourse in Central and Eastern Europe

Panel Chair: Nanci Adler, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust, and Genocide Studies, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands)
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1201

“Multi-Voiced Memories: Soviet Era Exhibitions in Ukrainian Museums,” Valentyna Kharkhun, Mykola Gogol State University (Ukraine)

“Commemorative Lawmaking in a Conservative Utopia: the Case of Poland,” Marta Bucholc, University of Bonn (Germany)

“Memory Layering. Enlarging Contested Memory Areas as Strategy of Political Memory Actors,” Mateusz Mazzini, University College London (United Kingdom)

“‘I Wish I Didn’t Know:’ The Problem of Knowledge in Hungary’s State Security Archives,” Maya Nadkarni, Swarthmore College

Commemorative Events and the Passage of Time: How to Redress Historical Injustices
Panel Chair: Alexander Karn, Colgate University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1302

“Canada at 150 Years: Community Stories of Rights and Justice,” Jennifer Claire Robinson, University of Victoria and Queen’s University (Canada)

“Commemorating Expulsion: Spain 1492-1992-2012,” Daniela Flesler and Adriàn Pérez Melgosa, Stony Brook University

“Women, 1916: Who is Remembered, and How?,” Michelle LeBaron, University of British Columbia (Canada)

“’The Rules of the House:’ Narrating Gendered and Sexual Violence Under the State Terror Regime in Post-Transitional Uruguay, Four Decades Later,” Gabriela Fried Amilivia, California State University, Los Angeles


3:15pm-3:30pm COFFEE BREAK (Fourth Floor, International Affairs Building)


3:30pm-5:00pm FOURTH SESSION

Uses of History in Genocide Prevention IV
Recording the Past and Thinking about the Future: Archives, Testimony, and Memory
Panel Chair: Pamela Graham, Columbia University
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1219

“Genocide Testimonies: Narrative and Ethnographic Approaches,” Sarah Federman, University of Baltimore

“How Community Archives Can Stall the Genocidal Project of Erasure,” Emily Willard, University of Washington

“Alternative Models of Collective Memory in Preventing Renewed Civil Wars: The U.S. and Nigerian Cases,” Roy Licklider, Rutgers University

“Using Memories of Past Atrocities to Prevent Future Occurrences: Indigenous Populations in Latin America,” Nadia Rubaii and Susan Appe, Binghamton University

Historical Memory in Liberal and Illiberal States
Panel Chair: Steve Winter, University of Auckland (New Zealand)
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1201

“Historical Amnesia and Sisyphean Politics,” Aviezer Tucker, Harvard University

“Historical Memory in Post-Communist Russia: ‘Warped,’ Vertical or Horizontal?,” Ilya Nuzov, Legal Consultant (Paris)

“‘Memory, Truth and Justice as a State Policy?’ The Argentine Case (2006-2016),” Gustavo Llarull, Cornell University

“(Re-)Storying Canada: Tracing the Politics of Indigenous and Settler Relations in an Age of Reconciliation,” Alexandra Marchel, University of Warwick (United Kingdom)


Film Screening: Bones of Contention, by Andrea Weiss

Discussion led by film director, Andrea Weiss, City College, CUNY
Room: International Affairs Building, Room 1512
Lining the roads of Spain, masked by miles and miles of pine trees, are unmarked graves in which over a hundred twenty thousand victims of the Franco regime are buried. Among them is Spain’s most famous poet, Federico García Lorca, who has become the symbol for both the historical memory and LGBT movements. The film explores the examined history of LGBT oppression during Spain’s fascist regime, and places it within the larger human rights struggle to find some justice for Franco’s victims. But how does a country excavate a past that is actively suppressed?

7:30pm-9:00pm: An optional walking tour, “The Other Side of Wall Street (1609-1680)”.
Black Gotham is offering a tour, “The Other Side of Wall Street (1609-1680),” to conference participants on Saturday, December 9, at 7:30pm. You must sign up online (participants are responsible for payment), preferably by December 2, here. This walking tour explores the establishment of the first free Black community in New York. The tour lasts 1.5 hours, and begins under the arch in Washington Square Park in the West Village. Please plan to arrive by 7:15 pm.